Clinical Leaflet

Why Music?

Music as a supportive intervention is being increasingly recognised as a viable option to combat multiple health conditions. Social enterprise Think Cre8tive Group CIC started offering specialised intervention that combines the restorative power of music with clinical skills in both Bolton and Wakefield in 2018.

Since then, we have run sessions for care and residential homes as well as intergenerational music sessions (focus on reducing depression, anxiety, loneliness, isolation, experience of pain). In 2019 we were able to expand our programme of delivery into groups for new-mums-and-babies (focus on preventing and/or reducing post-natal depression) and men’s recovery groups (focus on self-esteem, confidence and value, social connection). We have had interest expressed by local mental health teams as well as interest in prison work, subject to funding.

Our methodology uses trained musicians and trained health care workers together to deliver co-created singing sessions for an hour to specific population groups. Carefully-planned programmes and a relaxed approach aid voluntary involvement. The potential to develop an ongoing community model exists, as we:

• actively recruit trained/experienced music and   health volunteers

• produce and publish programme materials

• provide sponsored local community song-leader   professional development, and

• offer a mobile app to encourage individuals and   song-leaders to sing away from sessions.

We are looking for potential clinical partnerships to develop  short- (5-6 week) or long-term (ongoing) condition-specific group interventions as we apply for suitable funding. More information is available on our website and social media: www.thinkcre8tivegroup.com.

How music provides clinical support

RENAL FAILURE AND COMPLICATIONS

Listening to music during hemodialysis sessions indicates a statistically significant difference in anxiety, blood pressure, heart and respiratory rate, with lower pain and nausea scores.

Musical intervention on anxiety and vital parameters of chronic renal patients: a randomised clinical trial, Melo et al, 2018

Effects of music on complicactions during hemodialysis for chronic renal failure patients, Koca Kutlu and Eren, 2014

STROKE / MUSCOSKELETAL

Sound-based interventions can induce biomechanical changes in motor behaviour in stroke patients, lowering anxiety and depression,  and increasing hand strength and non-verbal relationships. 

The influence of sound-based interventions on motor behaviour after stroke: a systemematic review, van Criekinge et al, 2019

Active music therapy approach for stroke patients in the post-acute rehabilitation, Raglio et al, 2017 

FAMILY

ANTENATAL, NEONATAL, BABY/FAMILY CLINIC

Music is increasingly being used in paediatric health care (autism, disability, epilepsy, mental health, neonatal, neurorehabilitative, pain, anxiety, stress, oncology, palliative care), and positively affects physiologic indicators, feeding, length of stay, pain and parental stress. 

Music therapy and other music-based interventions in pediatric health care: an overview, Stegemann et al 2019

Does music positively impact preterm infant outcomes, O’Toole et al, 2017

CANCER RECOVERY

SUPPORT DURING TREATMENT

Music interventions reportedly decrease pain, stress, treatment-associated anxiety and improve heart rate, respiratory rate, blood pressure and quality of life.

Role of sonification and rhythmic auditory cueing for enhancing gait-associated deficits induced by neurotoxic cancer therapies: a perspective on auditory neuroprosthetics, Ghai and Ghai, 2019

The use of music therapy during the treatment of cancer patients: a collection of evidence, Boyde et al, 2012

Music interventions for improving psychological and physical outcomes in cancer patients, Bradt et al, 2016

BREAST CANCER

Music therapy is recommended for anxiety, stress reduction, depression and mood disorders.

A clinical randomized controlled trial of music therapy and progressive muscle relaxation training in female breast cancer patients after radical mastectomy: results on depression, anxiety and length of hospital stay, Zhou et al 2015 

Perioperative music and its effects on anxiety, hemodynamics and pain in women undergoing mastectomy, Bonns-Turner et al, 2011

PAEDIATRIC CANCER

Music calms, relieves distress, promotes relationships, enables self-care and hope in children.

Effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction combined with music therapy on pain, anxiety and sleep qusality in patients with osteosarcoma, Liu et al, 2019

Parents’ perspectives on their child’s music therapy: a qualitative study, Annesley, 2020

LONG TERM MANAGEMENT

CHRONIC ILLNESS PAIN MANAGEMENT

Music can elevate mood, improve motivation, increasing feelings of control and reduced pain, potentially as a result of distraction, relaxation, positive emotion or a combination.

Effect of music on chronic osteoarthritis pain in older people, McCaffrey R, Freeman E, 2003

Functional connectivity of music-induced analgesia in fibromyalgia, Pando-Naude et al, 2019

DEMENTIA, PARKINSON’S

Music may reduce depression, improve behavioural problems and over all quality of life in dementia, while singing may be an effective cueing technique for improving gait in Parkinson’s.

Music-based therapeutic interventions for people with dementia, Steen et al, 2018

The feasibility of singing to improve gait in Parkinson disease, Harrison et al, 2018

CARDIOLOGY, HYPERTENSION

Recreational music making impacts 12 molecular pathways (immune function and gene expression), while music intervention reduces systolic blood pressure from 144mmHg to 134mmHg, and diastolic blood pressure from 84mmHg to 78mmHg.

Recreational music-making alters gene expression pathways in patients with coronary heart disease, Bittman B et al, 2013

Systematic review and meta-analysis of music interventions in hypertension treatment, Kühlmann AYR et al, 2019

RESPIRATORY INTERVENTION

ASTHMA, COPD, LUNG DISEASE

Weekly community singing for participants with COPD provides evidence of improved exercise capacity, reduced anxiety, and reduced GP visits, hospital admissions and assessment tests.

Sing Your Lungs Out – a community singing group for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a 1-year pilot study, McNaughton et al, 2017

Singing for lung health: service evaluation of the British Lung Foundation programme, Lewis et al, 2018

MENTAL HEALTH INTERVENTION

ANXIETY, DEPRESSION, AGITATION, LONELINESS

Music interventions significantly reduced the experience of preoperative anxiety (equivalent to 21mm on a 100mm visual scale), while group music sessions showed significant improvements in participants with depression.

Meta-analysis evaluating music interventions for anxiety and pain in surgery, Kühlmann et al, 2018

Reviewing the effectiveness of music interventions in treating depression, Leubner and Hinterberger, 2017

SPEECH & LANGUAGE INTERVENTION

LANGUAGE DELAY / SPECIFIC LANGUAGE IMPAIRMENT

Music intervention significantly improves language impairment post stroke and may be useful in diagnosis and intervention in children with specific language impairment.

The Therapeutic effect of neurologic music therapy and speech language therapy in post-stroke aphasic patients, Lim et al, 2013

Music perception influences language acquisition: melodic and rhythmic-melodic perception in children with specific language impairment, Sallat and Jentschke, 2015

Frances Turnbull, Melanie Cossins and Pamela Eaton have an education master’s, healthcare master’s, and advanced music (Kodály) training, with qualifications in nursing and psychology.